Hestia2 in Stanford: visualising complex data

Archaeological Networks

Hestia_logo_whtRemember the Hestia2 event we organised in Southampton in July with The Connected Past? Time for more of that! The Hestia project is pleased to announce its second community event, which will take place at Stanford University on 4-5 November 2013. The two-day workshop, hosted by Stanford’s Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis, will tackle the issue of visualizing complex data, and will be of interest to anyone working on network theory and the digital analysis of literature and historical material.

It will include presentations from various local high-tech companies developing complex data analysis and hands-on work with the following humanities projects based in Stanford:
Orbis 2.0, the latest geospatial network model of the ancient world;
Arches, a new open-source geospatial software system for cultural heritage inventory and management;
– Palladio, a new platform for visualizing and analyzing networks of historical data;
– Topotime, a…

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Photogrammetry on the Pompeii Quadriporticus Project

The Archaeology of the Mediterranean World

This is the seventh in a series of posts exploring 3D modeling in Mediterranean and European archaeology. For more on this project click here. We hope these papers will start a discussion either in the comments of the blog or on Twitter using the #3DMedArch hashtag.

Eric Poehler, Assistant Professor, Department of Classics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst. 

3DThrusday

Since the inception of the Pompeii Quadriporticus Project in 2010, my co-director Steven Ellis and I have been exploring the use of photogrammetry to document one of the largest monumental structures at Pompeii as part of a comprehensive digital approach to the archaeological and architectural study of this building. Our approach has attempted to integrate photogrammetry with other imaging methods, including laser scanning and ground penetrating RADAR, as well as more traditional fieldwork digital products, such as standard photography, layered vector drawings, Harris matrices, and database records. The role that photogrammetry…

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Gizmodo Features Archaeology

Gizmodo.com is taking the opportunity of International Archaeology Day to write about the use of technology in archaeology:

Geoff Manaugh:  The Technology of Archaeology

Kelsey Cambell-Dollaghan:  “The Streets Are Hollow”: What’s It Like to Be an Archaeologist in NYC?

Geoff Manaugh:  Laser-Scanning Hundreds of Artificial Caves Beneath Nottingham

Robert Sorokanich:  Lasers, Drones, and Future Tech on the Front Lines of Archaeology

Geoff Manaugh:  Drone Mapping Lost Pyramids in the Andes

Jordan Kushins: Beneath the Streets, Lost Cities

Jaime Condliffe: CyArk Wants to Digitally Preserve 500 Heritage Sites In Just Five Years

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3D laser scanning within Skoteino Cave, Crete, Greece

3D Thursdays!

The Archaeology of the Mediterranean World

This is the sixth in a series of posts exploring 3D modeling in Mediterranean and European archaeology. For more on this project click here. We hope these papers will start a discussion either in the comments of the blog or on Twitter using the #3DMedArch hashtag.

Loeta Tyree, American School of Classical Studies, Athens, Greece

3DThrusday

Laser scanning within Skoteino Cave (Dark Cave in Greek) in north Central Crete, Greece was accomplished following a three year project to image this subterranean network. The cave is of interest because of its long history of anthropogenic use since the Bronze Age that includes its function as a Minoan ritual site in the Middle Minoan III-LM IIIB period (ca. 1450-1200 B.C.) and, again in Roman times and later (Tyree et al. 2005-2006). To better understand the relationship between the areas of ancient activity, and realizing the deficiencies of existing cave maps created by…

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3D Thursday – low-cost 3D

http://mediterraneanworld.wordpress.com/2013/10/10/closing-gaps-with-low-cost-3d/

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Bring in the Drones: 3D Modeling Using Aerial Imagery at Archaeological Excavations

3D Thursday!

The Archaeology of the Mediterranean World

This is the fourth in a series of posts exploring 3D modeling in Mediterranean and European archaeology. For more on this project click here. We hope these papers will start a discussion either in the comments of the blog or on Twitter using the #3DMedArch hashtag.

Ryan Baker, B.A. Student in Classical Archaeology. University of Texas. Co-Founder ArchAerial LLC.

For every joke I endured this summer about technology from the Starship Enterprise coming to the field of archaeology, a real conversation followed about the future of the discipline in terms of digital representations of an excavation.

3DThrusday

I’m an undergraduate student finishing my B.A. in Classical Archaeology at the University of Texas at Austin, and last fall I started a small business called Arch Aerial LLC that set out to create easy to use aerial photography platforms with autopilot capability in the form of multi-rotor helicopters and small fixed-wing UAV’s…

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Linear B in 3D

The Archaeology of the Mediterranean World

This is the third in a series of posts exploring 3D modeling in Mediterranean and European archaeology. For more on this project click here. We hope these papers will start a discussion either in the comments of the blog or on Twitter using the #3DMedArch hashtag.

Dimitri Nakassis, Associate Professor, University of Toronto

Bill’s invitation to write up some thoughts on 3D modeling in Mediterranean archaeology came at a welcome time for me, as I had just co-directed the first season of a project imaging the Linear B tablets from the “Palace of Nestor.” The project makes use of two 3D technologies: Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI) and 3D scanning using a Breuckmann smartSCAN 3D white light scanner.

I should probably take a step back and explain the project a little. The project is co-directed by myself and Kevin Pluta; also participating are James Newhard, who in handling…

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